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Brian Greene

Columbia University

Brian Greene is a professor of mathematics and physics at Columbia University, author of "The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory" (2003) and host of NOVA's "The Elegant Universe" (2003).

Brian Greene appears in the following:

The Trouble with Everything

Thursday, June 13, 2013

The desire to trace your way back to the very beginning, to understand everything -- whether it's the mysteries of love or the mechanics of the universe -- is deeply human. It might also be deeply flawed.

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Falling

Monday, September 20, 2010

We plunge into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, and upend some myths about falling cats.

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Taking the Plunge

Three stories that upend our pre-conceived notions about falling:

3. Falling Cats: David Quammen ponders the terminal velocity of a plummeting cat, teaches Jad a new word, and helps clear up some fallacies of feline physics.

4. Constantly Falling: Brian Greene explains why he can't answer the most basic question you can ask a physicist: "why do we fall?"

5. Falling Fortunes: Garrett Soden and Joan Murray introduce us to the 20th Century's greatest "gravity hero"--who, despite being the first person to survive a trip over Niagara Falls in a barrel, ultimately landed in a poorhouse.

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Space

Monday, October 22, 2007

We ponder our insignificant place in the universe, and boldly go after stories of romance & cynicism in Outer Space.

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No Special Now

It's not only artists who rebel against time, many physicists too take issue with our standard notion of clock time. Some even deny time exists at all. Blame Einstein. We peer into Pandora's box of post-Einsteinian physics with Brian Greene, Michio Kaku and Lisa ...

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Beyond Time

Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Fighting the inevitable march of time -- or at least the common sense view of it.

Comments [36]

Time

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

The strange, subjective nature of time -- from a sped-up spin through childhood, to a really, really slowed-down Beethoven symphony. 

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