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Holding Moonbeams in Your Hand

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How DO you hold a moonbeam in your hand? Finally we take a look at some people who are trying to reconcile the romantic and cynical perceptions of space by taking matters into their own hands. First, we'll hear about artist Dario Robleto's attempt to finish the lost Space Shuttles' work. Next, Dr. Peter Diamandis advocates for risk, enterprise and optimism for the non-governmental future of human space flight. We'll end our hour, looking back with a piece from producer Barrett Golding about the last transmission from the moon.

Comments [3]

Ken Druse

There could have been hundreds of reasons the seedlings died: did they have light? did they get fungal diseases? A person who says "seeds bloom" obviously doesn't know enough about nature and science to help germinating seedlings survive. Oh well, that's (ignorance) art.

Dec. 29 2012 12:48 PM
Jody from Kansas City

6th months later....i agree space seeds were completly captivating. was there any research to determine why the seeds don't last?

Apr. 15 2008 05:00 PM
Luther Gaylord from Ogden, Utah

The piece on Dario Robleto's "space seeds" was wholly captivating. You guys are the best storytellers on the air. Many thanks to Ira Glass for turning me on to your program.

Oct. 16 2007 02:20 PM

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