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15: Sum

Thursday, August 13, 2009 - 08:00 PM

LEGO afterlife (fd/flickr)

For meditation number fifteen we have a reading from David Eagleman's book Sum. It's a vision of the after life that's both playful and... horrifying. Sum is read by actor Jeffrey Tambor.

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Comments [15]

Karen Huddleston

I was under the impression that the "anj" in the beginning came from an edit in the middle of her word. That's what it sounds like to me at least.

Jun. 11 2013 01:31 PM
Brian

Two weeks listening to radiolab.

Aug. 23 2012 08:04 PM
Anne from Shawnee, KS

I too am wondering about the "WNYC anJ NPR"...why does she always say anj instead of and?

It is weird. Just curious...thought it might be a radio thing.

Nov. 08 2010 12:49 PM
Jeff Briggs

Great job! I am also interested in what the music was, can you let me know as well? Thanks

Nov. 19 2009 10:58 PM
Connor Walsh

The book Sum has had a huge boost in the UK, where it was praised in a Tweet by Stephen Fry – the nation's favourite intellectual/comedian/gentleman, and one-time half of a comic duo with Hugh Laurie, aka Dr House…!
http://www.thebookseller.com/news/96631-story-collection-soars-after-fry-tweet.html

Sep. 15 2009 04:21 PM
Jack

How did David Eagleman come up with the number 14 minutes for ultimate joy? Doesn't seem like enough...

Aug. 27 2009 01:20 AM
Rachel Katz Carey

I can't stop listening to this story. I love everything about it. I especially love how you scored and shaped it with the music. Can you tell me what the music was? Such a fabulous example of the splendid form AND content that is Radiolab. Thanks.

Aug. 25 2009 08:06 PM
Lulu Bee

After all we are the sum total of all of these experiences. Sad that joy would be so little.

Aug. 25 2009 10:51 AM
Bert

Why does she say "anj NPR" at around 44 seconds in? Why does she pronounce "and" as "anj"?

Aug. 18 2009 02:33 PM
Mike

I'm wondering if Radiolab will discuss the observations of people who've come as close to death as possible and returned to talk about it. The experiences of the clinically dead who have been resuscitated would be a fascinating topic in my opinion.

Aug. 17 2009 05:28 PM
Jerome

After having hear the podcast on the 'afterlife', I've immediately bought Eagleman's book and have devoured it.

He's got an awesome imagination and I really like the thought experiments he describes. Personally I can relate the most to the pantheistic sounding stories, those where you are part of the whole, where your atoms recombine differently after your death, etc

Aug. 13 2009 11:55 PM
Deborah

Yup... That's life, "hopping from spot to spot on the burning sand." That sums it all up. I'm so filled with joy right now. LoL ;)

Aug. 13 2009 09:53 PM
Ben

This daily update is AMAZING. Love it guys! Keep upt the great work!

Ben

Aug. 13 2009 09:25 PM
Scott

Sum. There's that tricky part in the after life in Sum, isn't there. How is it, except in fiction, that an after life can look toward an after life that is Life, but this very after life is only a collection of events which occur during Life. So ... in life we must have considered this. In Life our after life was dreamed about as life. An atypical vision. Seems like its understandable only after knowing that the After Life is a Sum. I see why Aaron was perhaps confused. Nice story. Seems to lend one to want to appreciate just what you have. Liked the story, if to just get me to consider this.

Thanks.

Aug. 13 2009 09:08 PM
Aaron

Upon first listen, I didn't fully understand this story. Another listen should do the trick for me.

I'm looking forward to the video tomorrow!

Aug. 13 2009 08:20 PM

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