Radiolab

Navigate
Return Home

Radiolab on Morning Edition

Tuesday, June 01, 2010 - 09:17 AM

Hey Folks,
We've got another piece up on NPR's Morning Edition today. It's all about Agatha Christie, the so-called "Nun Study," and what our writing can tell us about our brains. You can listen to the piece online and find a lot more information about the studies right HERE. (Make sure to check out the audio slideshow featuring Sister Alberta Sheridan.) And if you haven't heard it already, listen to our podcast of the story: Vanishing Words.

Tags:

More in:

Comments [3]

Kaleena

Is the morning edition a shortened version of the podcast?

Jun. 01 2010 06:08 PM
Skipper

I second the recommendation for the NPR "Audio Slideshow", especially if you liked Sister Alberta from Vanishing Words. Beautiful pairing of photos and brief narration: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=127241310

Jun. 01 2010 03:37 PM
Dick Myers

I heard the story this morning. Interesting!. I also wonder about the impact of aging on the physical act of writing - actually writing out the words on paper. I am 59 years old and find that my ability to write legibly and without errors has deteriorated. Maybe my mind is racing ahead and I just don't concentrate, or the fact that most of what I "write" now is typed into a computer rather than written down on paper. I have looked back at some of my college writings in notebooks and in various handwritten essays, and compared those with recent efforts. The difference is a little scary, particularly after hearing this story. Am I a candidate for Alsheimers?

Jun. 01 2010 02:37 PM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Supported by

Feeds