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Expanding The NPR Brand, Mom By Mom

Monday, February 17, 2014 - 08:00 AM

The other day, I wrote a post about a cartoonist, Connie Sun, and her thoughts about animals. Her mom heard about it, and called Connie to say "Yea!" and then, because she's an honest woman, she asked, "What is NPR?" Here's what happened next:

Connie J. Sun

I have this conversation all the time. So many people are not aware that NPR writes things, "posts" things. But we are spreading the word. (Going from "What is NPR?" to "NPR is blogs?" — that's progress, I think. No?)

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Comments [3]

Ross Cannon from Chicago WBEZ

Radio LAb is becoming one of my favorite NPR programs.
the topics are relevant and interesting...a great combo!
a few weeks ago the topic was death wishes and instructions
that Physicians had in place for their own lives. a friend
is a Death and Dying speaker and i wanted to pass this
great blod onto her. so far i have not found it. does anyone
know the topic name of that Radio Lab? keep doing what
you're doing! be well, Ross

Mar. 09 2014 01:51 PM
Troy from San Bernardino, Ca

Part 2

But the airwaves soon became crowded and the FCC started auctioning bandwidth. Radio was relegated to the lower frequencies because a little static on the radio was ok (not so with television). And television and radio lived happily together for 40 years. (end part I)

Then the internet was born. At first, it was a novelty. But quickly people started reading their news online and newspaper companies started to worry. Then people started listening to music online which worried the music industry. When people started watching snippets of home videos online, television companies started to worry.

And then cell phones became popular. So popular that the FCC had to find new bandwidth for them. Everyone went digital and squeezed into tiny gaps. And the entertainment industry saw the writing on the wall. Meanwhile consumers were watching their favorite television programs online and listening to their favorite programs and music on their mobile devices.

Smart media outlets learned how to do business in the digital age. 'Programming' became 'content' and became the vehicle through which hyper personalized advertisements were delivered. And we were happy to consume in spite of the privacy concerns.

And then one day, the FM bandwidth became too crowded. Mobile phone services started to out-bid television and radio companies for their airwaves to make more room for mobile data services. Cable companies, who previously made their money from deals with television companies, figured out they could make more money by offering high speed internet connections.

Radio went away first. Cars became internet enabled and the traveler could listen to any progra....err...content they wanted on any 'station' and in any language. And the consumer only noticed because suddenly their 'radio tuner' had six digits instead of four.

Then television went away. Again, no one really noticed except for a few people who didn't have 'the box' for their older equipment. But most people were happy to unload their aging VHS recorders and TiVo players; all content was delivered seamlessly on demand for a small price in addition to your data subscription and despite the frequency of the eerie targeted advertisements.

Feb. 24 2014 10:07 PM
Troy from San Bernardino, Ca

Part I

Once upon a time, there was radio. And it was good! You could just make out the entertainers voice above the static, and while the sound wasn't so good, if you couldn't make it to the concert hall, you could here some semblance of your favorite ditties in the comfort of your home.

And then there were movies. And they were good also. It took a while for engineers to figure out how to add sound and you still had to go out to a theater. News reels were delayed by weeks as film was processed. But you could still hear live entertainment on the radio!

And then television came around. Television broadcasted on a newly discovered band of radio signals called FM. Even radio went to FM because of the higher quality of the transmission. Very quickly, everyone in range of an FM tower had televisions, but they kept their radios because it wasn't always convenient to sit and stare at a television. (Also, cars didn't come equipped with televisions).

But the airwaves soon became crowded and the FCC started auctioning bandwidth. Radio was relegated to the lower frequencies because a little static on the radio was ok (not so with television). And television and radio lived happily together for 40 years. (end part I)

Feb. 24 2014 10:06 PM

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