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A moment of silence after the death of Lance Corporal Jonathan Taylor, Killed in Action December 1st, 2009, Afghanistan (Photo Credit: Lynsey Addario/ Getty Images Reportage)

In December of 2009, photojournalist Lynsey Addario was embedded with a medevac team in Afghanistan. After days of waiting, one night they got the call - a marine was gravely wounded. What happened next happens all the time. But this time it was captured, picture by picture, in excruciating detail. Horrible, difficult, and at times strikingly beautiful, those photos raise some questions: Who should see them, who gets to decide who should see them, and what can pictures like that do, to those of us far away from the horrors of war and those of us who are all too close to it?

Special thanks to Chris Hughes and Helium Records for the use of Shift Part IV from the album Shift

Guests:

Lynsey Addario

Comments [10]

I also only get just over 12 minutes. Need to hear the rest of the story...

Jun. 24 2016 11:04 AM
yc

Where is the rest of the podcast? It ends at 12:23 for me.

May. 02 2016 02:41 PM
Michael Hammerschlag from Europe

This is second time I've heard this story, and as a photographer, you just can't do that- give the subject's family or subject the right to reject things... because they will do it. And they are your photographs, but more so, in a war, where all these things are kept secret, esp by the Bush Admin. of their Iraq Invasion treason, they belong to the country. Everyone must see the cost of war, or it can and will be glorified and romanticized to lure more youthful recruits and canon foder. Like she said, in Vietnam nobody asked anything, and journos were never more powerful- for good and bad. I did a whole lecture about that at Brown: GETTING GOOD NEWS: THE GOV vs the PRESS in TIMES of WAR http://hammernews.tk/goodnews.wma

Feb. 21 2016 09:44 PM
Kevin Barry from Yorktown VA

Probably the most powerful, moving story I've ever heard on radio. Well done, Radiolab.

Feb. 21 2016 09:32 PM
Laura from Oregon

This is storytelling at its very best. This real-life story was messy, complicated, breathtakingly loving -- and the telling of the story didn't get in the way. I have such respect for this young man's family and for the photojournalist who wrestled with such a personal and professional decision (and in my opinion landed, with TIME, at the ethical conclusion). My heart is opened wider. Thank you.

Feb. 21 2016 02:11 PM
Laura from Oregon

This is storytelling at its very best. This real-life story was messy, complicated, breathtakingly loving -- and the telling of the story didn't get in the way. I have such respect for this young man's family and for the photojournalist who wrestled with such a personal and professional decision (and in my opinion landed, with TIME, at the ethical conclusion). My heart is opened wider. Thank you.

Feb. 21 2016 02:10 PM
Genevieve Van Cleve from Austin, Texas

Had to see the picture discussed in this story. Amazing.

Feb. 21 2016 01:35 PM
Ginny K. from Massachusetts

The parents' excruciating decision is totally understandable. He was, first and foremost, their son. His role as a soldier is secondary. While I agree that we need to be more honest with ourselves about who we are and what the consequences of our nation's actions are, doing so at the expense of any one family is not the way to do it.

Feb. 20 2016 04:00 PM
Sam from San Diego

To think of all the men killed and all the families ruined, because one father wanted to hide his daughters from the reality of life and a photographer who forgot who she owes her work to. Their sons life was dedicated to the country once he signed up for the army and our country deserves to see lives ruined at our tax expense. This American lie by omission, fear to look at life and consequences of our actions will lead to much more recombine. This is not a story of a soldiers death, but our American cowardice and inability to see ourselves as we are and change our course.

Feb. 20 2016 02:57 PM
Millard Arnold from NC

wow, amazing documentary on how an embedded photog's event and the interviewer's remarks.

Feb. 20 2016 01:55 PM

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